South Sudan slams USA travel advisory

South Sudanese government on Sunday described as "unnecessary" the United States travel advisory warning Americans against traveling to the East African country due to crime and armed conflict.

 
Foreign Affair spokesman, Mawien Makol said President Salva Kiir administration is very committed to protecting its citizens including foreign nationals like U.S. citizens who travel to Juba and other parts of the world's youngest nation.
 
"Even though President Donald Trump government continues to issue travel advisories to its citizens in South Sudan, Juba is constantly processing entry visas for many U.S. citizens who come to the country on private missions," Makol told Xinhua.
 
Washington on Thursday renewed advisory, saying violent crimes including car-jacking, killings, ambushes, assaults, robberies, and kidnappings are widely common throughout South Sudan and warned U.S. citizens not to travel to the world's newest country.
 
But Makol criticized Washington and said all citizens of different nationalities are free to come to the country, saying the government is ready to offer them safety and protection despite conflict.
 
The advisory warns of cattle raids throughout the country that can lead to violence.
 
It also lists several suggestions for people who choose to travel to the country including avoiding border travel, demonstrations and photography and taking several steps to establish identity and proof of life and inform others of the trip.
 
This comes after South Sudanese warring parties signed ceasefire deal including disengagement, separation of forces in proximity, withdrawal of allied troops, opening of humanitarian corridors and release of prisoners of war and political detainees.
 
South Sudan's conflict that has now entered its fifth year erupted in 2013 after forces loyal to President Salva Kiir and his former deputy Riek Machar engaged in combat.
 
The 2015 peace agreement to end the violence was again violated in July 2016 when the rival factions resumed fighting in the capital, Juba, forcing Machar to flee into exile.
 
Millions of South Sudanese civilians have sought refuge in neighboring countries as the conflict rages on despite attempts by international players to end it.
 
Source: http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2018-07/02/c_137294113.htm

Recommended News

Recommended Travel Agency

Recommended Travel Offers

Recommended Travel Packages

Photo Gallery